Which is changing, the beauty or the beholder?

Standard

A quick overview of my cross platform project will be looking at the evolution of women’s body types, and what is considered beautiful to the public eye. The goal of my project is to educate the public on the changing perception of what is considered beautiful in relation to women and their physical appearance. In my blog I will focus on the different stereotypical “beautiful” body types for women and how those perceptions have drastically changed from generation to generation. The causes for these changes derive from what the media advertises to the public to be viewed as beautiful. What used to be popular, and publicly portrayed as being beautiful is nowhere near what is now being considered beautiful. In past generations, those thought to be beautiful were quite voluptuous, and very curvy, with a pale complexion. Now, after a few generations have passed, the media has taken it upon itself to change the definition of what is considered beautiful. Now they portray the “norm” to be a size 0, very tall, and as tan as possible. Those who are not up to those “standards” are just airbrushed and physically enhanced in other ways to conform to those standards. However, even some of the women who are very skinny and tan still get criticized by other demographics for being “too” skinny or “too” tan. I believe that women in today’s society are in a lose-lose situation. They are either considered too fat or too skinny, too pale or too tan, too tall or too short, the list is endless. “Television, magazines, movies, newspapers, billboards, and the internet are all powerful creators of the ‘desirable’ man or woman. They reinforce and perpetuate stereotypes with which we compare the reality of our own bodies. Similarities between the ‘ideal’ and our own bodies are commended and differences are considered unattractive”(Australian Sports Commission). Even girls are taught at a young age that the perception of beauty is unachievable. For example, consider “Barbie’s” long blond hair, her glassy eyed stare, perfect features, and 40-18-32 measurements. These perceptions of beauty are what is causing problems in society. No one can achieve the same features as Barbie, yet children are taught at a young age that Barbie is the standard for what is pretty. This causes girls to start using tanning beds, go on “diets” at a very young age, and use make-up in grade school. Does anyone else get sick watching the children’s beauty pageants on TV? Those girls are caked with make-up, spray tanned, wearing fake teeth, tons of jewelry, fake nails, and wearing provocative clothing. What happened to little kids being innocent and cute, wearing pig-tails, missing their front teeth, and wearing silly mismatched outfits? It’s sickening to see how some children are raised to conform to the new definition of beauty in our society, just because the media has began to portray it in such a way. Whether you are 5’11” or 4’11”, 115 lbs. or 215 lbs., tan or pale, you can still be beautiful, because true beauty is on the inside.

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Reference List:

Australian Sports Commission. (2014, February 3). Retrieved from http://www.ausport.gov.au

Dreisbach, S. (2012). Glamour. Retrieved from http://www.glamour.com/health-fitness/2012/05/weight-stereotyping-the-secret-way-people-are-judging-you-based-on-your-body-glamour-june-2012

Young, A. (n.d.). The Negative Portrayal of Women. Retrieved from http://library.thinkquest.org/21298/Mind&Body/Portrayl.html